NHS Pay Scales 2024/25 (predicted – updated May 2024)

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This article contains predicted NHS pay rises for 2024/25 and was last updated in May 2024.

The figures are based on expectations that staff will receive a pay increase of 3.5% when the government announces the latest round of pay increases in summer 2024. Until the pay deal is officially announced, this page should only be used as a guide – the pay deal is likely to be between 2-5%, but the exact figure will not be known until later this year.

Find out more about the pay review process, and when we are expecting the pay rise to be announced in our main article about this year’s pay rise and why our latest pay prediction for May 2024 is a 3.5% pay rise, a small increase on our prediction from April. You can also find out why most NHS staff will have a slight increase in pay unrelated to the main NHS pay rise in their April 2024 pay packets.

Note that staff working in London or the surrounding areas are eligble for an additional High Cost Area Supplement in addition to the figures shown below, increasing pay by at least £1,235 (in addition to the figures below) following the expected pay rise for this year.

Band 1

Band 1 is no longer used as a point on the Agenda for Change contracts. Find out more about the history of Band 1 and the remaining NHS staff on this band.

Band 2

Staff in Band 2 (such as healthcare assistants, administrative assistants and catering staff) currently start on a salary of £22,383. This would increase to £23,166 following the pay rise.

There is currently no pay progression within Band 2.

Band 3

Staff in Band 3 (such as healthcare assistants) currently start on a salary of £22,817. This would increase to £23,616 following the pay rise.

After two years of experience at this band, most staff will receive a pay increase to £24,336. This would increase to £25,188.

Band 4

Staff in Band 4 (such as office co-ordinators or HR assistants) currently start on a salary of £25,146. This would increase to £26,026 following the pay rise.

After three years of experience at this band, most staff will receive a pay increase to £27,596. This would increase to £28,562.

Band 5

Staff in Band 5 (such as newly qualified nurses) start on a salary of £28,408. This would increase to £29,402 following the pay rise.

After two years of experience at this band, most staff will receive a pay increase to £30,639. This would increase to £31,711.

Staff will receive a further pay rise after two more years of experience, to £34,581. This would increase to £35,791.

Band 6

Staff in Band 6 (such as occupational therapists or some more experienced nurses) start on a salary of £35,391. This would increase to £36,630 following the pay rise.

After two years of experience at this band, most staff will receive a pay increase to £37,351. Following the pay rise this would increase to £38,658.

Staff will receive a further pay rise after three more years of experience, to £42,617. This would increase to £44,108.

Band 7

Staff in Band 7 (such as clinical pharmacists, communications managers, or service managers) start on a salary of £43,737. Following the pay rise, this would increase to £45,267.

After two years of experience at this band, most staff will receive a pay increase to £45,996. This would increase to £47,606.

Staff will receive a further pay rise after three more years at this level, to £50,055. THis would increase to £51,807.

Band 8a

Staff in Band 8a (such as HR business partners, advanced nurse practitioners, or senior physician associates) start on a salary of £50,952. This would increase to £52,735 after the pay rise.

After five years of experience at this level, most staff will receive a pay increase to £57,350. This would increase to £59,357.

Also note that there is no automatic advancement from band 8a to 8b. Find out more about pay progression here.

Band 8b

Staff in Band 8b (such as heads of departments, consultant pharmacists, or senior general managers) start on a salary of £59,972. This would increase to £62,071 following the pay rise.

After five years, most staff will receive a pay increase to £68,530. This would increase to £70,929.

Also note that there is no automatic advancement from band 8b to 8c. Find out more about pay progression here.

Band 8c

Staff in Band 8c (such as associate directors, consultant clinical scientists or nurse consultants) start on a salary of £70,417. This would increase to £72,882 following the pay rise.

After five years at this band, most staff will receive a pay increase to £81,138. This would increase to £83,978 after the pay rise.

Also note that there is no automatic advancement from band 8c to 8d. Find out more about pay progression here.

Band 8d

Staff in Band 8d (such as service directors, programme leads, or deputy directors) start on a salary of £83,571. This would increase to £86,496 following the pay rise.

After five years, most staff will receive a pay increase to £96,376. This would increase to £99,749 after the pay rise.

Band 9

Staff in Band 8d (such as clinical directors or programme directors) start on a salary of £99,891. This would increase to £103,387 following the pay rise.

After five years, most staff will receive a pay increase to £114,948. This would increase to £118,971.

Some senior staff are on the Very Senior Manager payscale (effectively above Band 9). The pay deal for these managers is negotiated separately and has tended to include a smaller pay rise than other staff in recent years.

35 replies on “NHS Pay Scales 2024/25 (predicted – updated May 2024)”

  • I think it’s wrong how it take band 4 Three years receive any increase in their pay

    Dawn rybczynski
    • I totally agree with this! It’s frustrates me how the band 4 is always undervalued

    • I Agree I’ve been in band 4 post for 2 years and have to wait another year when band 5 gets it after 2 years, shame

  • The banding is ridiculous. Someone could be under the same band as someone else and have so much more responsibility and yet paid the same. Does not make sense.

    • Not really. NHS pay bandings are usually based around level of responsibility within the job role

      • 💯 agree

      • I’m a Band 2 community health Care assistant on the same banding as a service assistant soi have more responsibility than they do,I’m not undervaluing them but I have more responsibility on the same banding . How is that right.

      • What would you expect the banding should be for a member of staff who:
        Deals with bodies/ assisting with mortuary duties including viewings, police and coroner access.
        Attends and assists in all cardiac arrests, collapses and falls.
        Directs helicopters for landing
        Leads in major incidents
        Attends all fire alarms and either evacuate the area or tackle the fire.
        Help with hospital lockdown for incidents
        Collect blood for major bleeds
        Collect samples and specimens
        Manage and distribute medical gasses throughout the hospital?
        A lot of responsibility for any member of staff, so what should that banding be?

      • disagree with this comment, I’m a band 2 entering data, producing reports and in sole charge of a database yet I get paid the same as the domestic (absolutely no disrespect to the domestics who work hard) but not quite the same responsibilities!

        • I fully agree I’m a ward clerk responsible for all the admin , admissions , discharges , transports etc etc and I’m on same hourly rate as the lady who cleans the floor , as you say their job is still essential but from a responsibility point of view there’s no comparison

        • Depends on whether you value a clean hospital and place that high on the list of essentials I think. They hold a responsible job, that is definitely undervalued. As someone who worked as a service assistant in a hospital but is now a band 4 with an ambulance service, I think more value should be placed on the band 2’s. Much more.

      • Can be true. I’m a band 3 and have had band 5s and 6s work sent my way multiple times

      • Band 3 that cannulate are massively undervalued, I work In CT/MRI take bloods and cannulate have to learn two modalities, and some other band 3 do not do much work it is not fair and secretaries and other admin band 4 roles are paid more it is really bad. The nhs banding for some roles need to be pushed up higher

        emma sabine
    • Its a thing called doing more work on a lower pay!

  • What we need firstly is for the pay rise to happen in April, it’s not as if we can delay paying all the cpi/rpi increases in bills until we get the pay rise, it’s no shock a pay rise happens in April, but it’s the same every year, we have to wait until later in the year to get the pay rise through, back dated, but that’s not the point, increased bills and cost of living still need paying from April.

    I have every sympathy for the Doctors demands, if I take a look at my “pay rises” for the last 12 years on the same band I’ve also lost about 25% of my spending power. Almost every year the pay rises in real terms is another pay cut.

    Basically all public sector workers should be linked to something like the CPI or RPI or some agreed formula. You are then paid X… it’s worth the same in 10 years time, yet successive governments use the public sector pay awards as a way to grab money off the workers, then scratch their head when they strike, as if they don’t know what they are doing.

    • This is Conservative Policy, since 2010. My Senior manager commented that apart from screwing the Public Sector (and thus the private sector who were competing for staff) taking billions out of wages and the economy would put an end to growth, which is exactly where we find ourselves now

      James Michael McDonnell
    • Totally agree with this. It amazes me how the government are aware that the pay rise is in April but have to have “negotiations” about what they deem reasonable and fair. If they’re going to do this then they should start the negotiations 6 months before the pay rise, not 6 months after!!

      Kelvin
  • I am starting a band 5 staff nurse job at a London Hospital Trust. My starting salary is for newly qualified nurse. I am 2yrs 7 months as a nurse, does my pay scale band be higher than the starting salary for a newly qualified?

    ZENIA ZULU
  • It appears as if there is no uniformity in the he pay scales, rates and banding. I have 16 yrs of post qualification experience in Post – Graduate Diploma – Mental Health Nursing, having completed my programme of study -Dec.13 2007
    My current salary is £34.581. This is heartbreaking considering the cost of living crisis in the London plus the fact that there some newly qualified -2018 who are placed on higher banding and paid higher than us. This is not fair

  • In some trusts electricians are band 4 in others they are band 5 for same job. Why is this?

    • Try being a band 2 with zero overtime or unsociable hours pal. Band 2 are treated terribly by all the other selfish nhs staff on other banding. It’s disgusting.

  • Why does a band 4 in Scotland NHS on £2000 more than in England. I’m basically a cheap nurse. Band 4s need to be more valued…

    • In Dog
      In Scotland all bands from 4 and above are 2000 plus better than England branding we pay more tax not cause all banding should be equal in UK agenda for change is a shambles

  • I have now reached the top[ of Band 4. I speak to people that are dying or potential to die every day and support families of these patients. I sort out benefits, transport, housing concerns. Contact GP, safe guarding issues and Adult Social Care issues. Surely they need to look at Band 4s and have more increments so they have to rely on the pittance of a pay rise each year.

  • I don’t understand why there is always a delay till summer for our pay rises. Then they think providing backdated pay is a good thing when it just gets taken away in tax. its not fair. The average salary in the UK is supposed to be 35k and yet most of us are all under this. The pay rise needs to happen sooner.

  • They want to give 3.5% pay rise when bill and food price is rised more than 10%. how is that fair?

  • Band 2 is unfair discrimination as there is progression in every other band now but not band 2. Surely this is against what was agreed under agenda for change. Band 2 needs to be reassessed but as there is such a small difference from band 2 to bottom of band 3 they would also need to reassess band 3. Experienced staff should be rewarded twenty something years of experience now counts for nothing. It is insulting and should be addresses as soon as possible.

  • I’m studying a degree apprenticeship with the NHS, took a pay cut from band three to band two in order to progress my career, to be told that “at least you’re being paid more than minimum wage.” I didn’t de-skill when I started the apprenticeship. And now there’s no pay progression in band 2. I think NHS Apprenticeship pay needs some more guidance. There might not be a student loan, but living costs are still higher due to studying, and loosing out on unsocial hours & overtime opportunities. Plus as an apprentice, none of the financial support targeted to healthcare students is available..

  • Top of band 3 for years now doing data entry etc etc not many band 4 roles to move into
    If I apply in another hospital my fares will increase so what I gain on the roundabout I loose on the swings

    Carol corbett
  • Im a band 2 csw, but go way over my paid job skills, according to unison for the things I do such as wound care, gluing, casting, passing NGS, doing NGS feeds, doing catheters I should be paid as a band 2 but the trusts refuse to pay us properly. And now we are literally paid minimum wage. its so wrong and unfair.

  • Im a band 2 csw, but go way over my paid job skills, according to unison for the things I do such as wound care, gluing, casting, passing NGS, doing NGS feeds, doing catheters I should be paid as a band 3 but the trusts refuse to pay us properly. And now we are literally paid minimum wage. its so wrong and unfair and down grading. Ive worked in the nhs for 10 years and at this time now i have never felt as abused as I feel now

  • Working in the operating theatre for over 36 years on band 3 had last incremental pay increase in 2012, have nvq’s and advanced level diplomas and done recovery modules and still a band 3 where’s the justice in that…

  • This is still waiting to be approved but there is a petition to link public sector pay with CPI

  • Have been on band 2 for 12 years as a pharmacy storekeeper huge workload and responsibility running an fixing dispensing robot,absolutely disgusted at now minimum wage.Also and not being disrespectful at all to domestics etc and band 2’s with less responsibility but how is this right.Greggs pay £12.50 ph for serving pasties,how can Government not see this and how members of staff leave in huge numbers.We love our NHS so why not pay us what we rightly deserve,feel degraded and so undervalued and these people who think they know what it’s like to survive on minimum wage

  • A receptionist who deals with patients face to face as well as making appointments, checking and chasing missing outcomes, managing patient notes received into the department all paid as a Band 2. someone working in the booking office sitting in front of a screen, only dealing with patients over the phone and making appointments is paid as a band 3. Where is the logic in that. Don’t get me started on how someone can make more money an hour stacking shelves in Tesco then they can doing reception in a hospital.

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